Shiloh MOBI ð Paperback

Shiloh ❰PDF❯ ❤ Shiloh Author Shelby Foote – Liversite.co.uk This fictional re creation of the battle of Shiloh in April fulfills the standard set by his monumental history, conveying both the bloody choreography of two armies and the movements of the combatan This fictional re creation of the battle of Shiloh in Aprilfulfills the standard set by his monumental history, conveying both the bloody choreography of two armies and the movements of the combatants hearts and minds.


10 thoughts on “Shiloh

  1. Candi Candi says:

    A book about war, to be read by men, ought to tell what each of the twelve of us saw in our own little corner Then it would be the way it was not to God but to us I don t know why I have this partiality for war novels Somehow I m drawn to them, despite the anguish and gruesomeness I imagine it s because these books strip humanity down to its bare bones, and that is something that always appeals to me Perhaps by looking at the core of our being, I believe I ll come closer to understandingA book about war, to be read by men, ought to tell what each of the twelve of us saw in our own little corner Then it would be the way it was not to God but to us I don t know why I have this partiality for war novels Somehow I m drawn to them, despite the anguish and gruesomeness I imagine it s because these books strip humanity down to its bare bones, and that is something that always appeals to me Perhaps by looking at the core of our being, I believe I ll come closer to understanding mankind and what makes us really tick I expect I ll never uncover an answer, but I ll keep searching In this slim work of fiction of the Battle of Shiloh, a two day campaign of the Civil War, Shelby Foote combines factual details and real historical figures along with several invented characters We meet the giants of the battle, so to speak men like Sherman, Grant, Johnston, Forrest, Beauregard, Wallace, Buell and others But each chapter is told from the point of view of an imaginary soldier or officer of the army, alternating between North and South This approach brings the reader up close and personal to the battle, right in the midst of the anticipation of fighting and the combat itself It s a technique that is very efficient The reader experiences the emotions of the characters, senses the confusion, and ultimately questions the value of warring against one another So many of these men were quite young Many had not marched to battle ever before A lot of them didn t necessarily even deeply comprehend what they were fighting for to begin with I found the musing of one lieutenant particularly poignant as he reminisces of his parents during the time just before the skirmish beginsIt seemed strange that they had met and loved and gone through all that joy and pain, living and dying so that I could lie by a Tennessee campfire under a spangled reach of April sky, thinking of them and the life that had produced me I suspect many a young man was told of the glories of war, the heroism of those that would leave home and fight for a cause, no matter the cause When landed squarely in the action, however, I have a further hunch that many found the luster to fade to dullness and a lowness of spirit Dying itself no longer held the splendor it once dideven the dead and dying didn t have any decency about them first the Yankees back on the slope, crumpled and muddy where their own men had overrun them, then the men in the field beyond the tents, yelping like gut shot dogs while they died The book starts and ends with the reflections of one young man, Lieutenant Palmer Metcalfe, aide de camp to General Albert Sidney Johnston of the Confederate Army It s rather striking to see the difference two days make in the heart of a man after defeat, as he ponders what went wrong Shiloh is brilliantly researched by Shelby Foote, a noted American Civil War historian It depicts the horror of the war and the inner minds of those characters that represent a nation of men split apart during the infancy of this new country It didn t quite have the emotional pull for me as did Howard Bahr s The Black Flower A Novel of the Civil War, but it came pretty damn closeI got the notion they were not only trying to get away from the fighting, they were trying to walk right out of the human race


  2. Zoeytron Zoeytron says:

    Historical fiction at its finest Shelby Foote manages to pick you up and set you right down in the middle of things so that it is almost like being there A two day battle at Shiloh in the Spring of 1862 is laid out, alternating between the voices Confederate and Union soldiers Slogging through mud up to their shins, sodden, sleep deprived, weary to the very bone The smoke and haze hanging in the air from the rifles, bugles blaring, Rebel yells echoing bravado both feigned and real The Historical fiction at its finest Shelby Foote manages to pick you up and set you right down in the middle of things so that it is almost like being there A two day battle at Shiloh in the Spring of 1862 is laid out, alternating between the voices Confederate and Union soldiers Slogging through mud up to their shins, sodden, sleep deprived, weary to the very bone The smoke and haze hanging in the air from the rifles, bugles blaring, Rebel yells echoing bravado both feigned and real The terrified horses of the Calvary, screaming and showing the whites of their eyes as bullets fly and cannons boom Excellent fare


  3. Diane Barnes Diane Barnes says:

    No hesitation in giving these 5 stars to this one It put me squarely on the battlefield with all five senses The generals are depicted by fictional characters, with their words and actions on the field drawn from reports, letters and diaries, nothing made up Same with the weather on the two days of fighting, and the withdrawal from the field on the day after The fictional characters were all enlisted men, from both sides, telling us what they saw from their little corners of the action It w No hesitation in giving these 5 stars to this one It put me squarely on the battlefield with all five senses The generals are depicted by fictional characters, with their words and actions on the field drawn from reports, letters and diaries, nothing made up Same with the weather on the two days of fighting, and the withdrawal from the field on the day after The fictional characters were all enlisted men, from both sides, telling us what they saw from their little corners of the action It was a very effective technique, resulting in a you are there quality Enough from me, hear about it from the men themselves I could see their faces then, and the army became what it really was forty thousand men they were young men mostly, lots of them even younger than myself, and I was nineteen I thought Lord to God, they re shooting they re shooting at me And it surprised me so, I stopped to look I didn t want to have anyto do with the war if this was the way it was going to be I was what you might call unnerved, for they may warn you there s going to be bleeding in battle, but you don t believe it til you see the blood They took killing better than any natural men would ever do, and they had a way of yelling that didn t sound even partly human, high and quavery, away up in their throats, without any brain behind it Shelby Foote took me there, showed me both sides, superiority and failings of North and South, gave me brief histories of Grant, Sherman, Johnston and Nathan Bedford Forrest, and threw in a little philosophy about war in general, and this war in particular How lucky we are that one of our best historians was also an amazing novelist as well


  4. Sara Sara says:

    Told through the eyes of several fictitious soldiers, representing both sides of the conflict, Shiloh reads like non fiction Shelby Foote has created the men, but the events and the circumstances are as genuine as they could possibly be, and the major figures of the battle, Johnston, Sherman, Wallace, Forest are there, exactly as they were in life, and the words they say are not put into their mouths but come from first hand accounts and memoirs.If you can bear it, this is a way to see the batt Told through the eyes of several fictitious soldiers, representing both sides of the conflict, Shiloh reads like non fiction Shelby Foote has created the men, but the events and the circumstances are as genuine as they could possibly be, and the major figures of the battle, Johnston, Sherman, Wallace, Forest are there, exactly as they were in life, and the words they say are not put into their mouths but come from first hand accounts and memoirs.If you can bear it, this is a way to see the battle as it occurred Foote engages all of your senses, you not only see the battle, you smell it, taste it, feel it, and hear it It swells around you and shakes the earth you are standing on No wonder Ken Burns drafted Shelby Foote for his Civil War series, Shelby Foote had already mastered the exact method Burns employed for pulling the viewer reader onto the battlefield At one point I saw a reb and a Union man lying on opposite sides of the road, both in the standard prone position for firing Their rifles were level and they both had one eye shut They had the same wound, a neat red hole in the forehead, and they were stone dead, still lying there with the sights lined up they must have fired at the same time Looking at them I thought of the terrible urgency they both must have felt in the last half second before they both pulled trigger.And, no one understands the South better than Foote He sees it with love, I believe, but without sentiment I remember what my father had said about the South bearing within itself the seeds of defeat, the Confederacy being conceived already moribund We were sick from an old malady, he said incurable romanticism and misplaced chivalry, too much Walter Scott and Dumas read too seriously We were in love with the past, he said in love with death.Perhaps this explains why I feel so connected to the Civil War still after all, I love Scott and Dumas A footnote that makes no difference but gave me delight one of the men mentioned by name was Burt Tapley of Mississippi Tapley happens to be a family name, so I wondered if this was just a coincidence, destined to make me feel a bit closer to the action, or if this man was a name gleaned from the record and a possible ancestor who saw the action first hand


  5. Bob Mayer Bob Mayer says:

    I read this as part of my research for a series on West Point graduates in the Civil War I remember Shelby Foote from his appearances on Ken Burns Civil War mini series which I ve watched untold number of times Shiloh was a particularly bloody battle and Foote captures the feelings and essence of it What s most unique about this book is how he changes point of view from the various soldiers on both sides You truly get a feeling for it.Visiting the battlefield a couple of years ago, it was i I read this as part of my research for a series on West Point graduates in the Civil War I remember Shelby Foote from his appearances on Ken Burns Civil War mini series which I ve watched untold number of times Shiloh was a particularly bloody battle and Foote captures the feelings and essence of it What s most unique about this book is how he changes point of view from the various soldiers on both sides You truly get a feeling for it.Visiting the battlefield a couple of years ago, it was interesting to compare scenes in the book with the actual terrain How the sunken road wasn t really sunken How small bloody pond is One thing that intrigued me walking the terrain and as a military man, was contemplating what would have happened had the South s battle plan unfolded as they wanted The terrain near the TN River was not advantageous for an assault In essence this battle became a bloody slugfest, portending, as Foote says in the mini series, what manybattles in the Civil War would become.As a West Point graduate it struck me when we had to memorize a piece of plebe trivia in 55 of 60 battles in the Civil War, West Pointers commanded both sides One side in the remaining 5 That fascinated me so much over the years I wrote my own first trilogy that leads up to Shiloh in the third book BTW first book, West Point to Mexico, is free on Kindle 3 3 2014 to 3 7 2014 I find it amazing that these men who sat next to each other in class, sweated next to each other in training, then fought against each other to such extremes


  6. Laura Laura says:

    Excellent Battles are ugly I loved how Foote s descriptions and accounts made you feel like you were right there in the battle For a topic so complicated, he makes it easy to follow and you are easily engaged.


  7. Lawyer Lawyer says:

    Shelby Foote s ShilohShiloh was selected by Diane Barnes as her Moderator s Choice forOn the Southern Literary TrailReview under construction Shelby Foote s ShilohShiloh was selected by Diane Barnes as her Moderator s Choice forOn the Southern Literary TrailReview under construction


  8. Francisco Francisco says:

    If you like Shelby Foote the man, his slow Southern drawl, his humor and scholarship all wrapped up in one, you ll like this book Truth and beauty at their single hearted best Books like this make my heart beat faster, they take my breath away.


  9. Stenwjohnson Stenwjohnson says:

    Shelby Foote s novel Shiloh was published in 1952, but Civil War aficionados will notice a striking technical similarity to Michael Shaara s 1974 Gettysburg novel The Killer Angels Since Foote belatedly gained his largest audience after his participation in Ken Burns Civil War series in 1990, many readers will have experienced Shaara s novel first Both recreate the events of major Civil War battles through shifting, multiple narrators, with Shaara s focused on the broader historical record, r Shelby Foote s novel Shiloh was published in 1952, but Civil War aficionados will notice a striking technical similarity to Michael Shaara s 1974 Gettysburg novel The Killer Angels Since Foote belatedly gained his largest audience after his participation in Ken Burns Civil War series in 1990, many readers will have experienced Shaara s novel first Both recreate the events of major Civil War battles through shifting, multiple narrators, with Shaara s focused on the broader historical record, relying on tactical maps and the subjective insights of military leaders such as Lee and Chamberlain Foote s work isself consciously literary, as rank and file soldiers on both sides describe a chaotic battle that degenerated into shocking brutally Reminiscences are modulated by personality, background, and the period of the battle experienced each narrator comments on a specific sequence of the action, which is ultimately rendered as a series of incomplete, if contiguous, impressions For that reason, Foote s work may be closer to the elusive truth of combat experience As one Union soldier comments, echoing the author s likely credo Books about war were written to be read by God Almighty, because no one but God ever saw it that way A book about war to be read by men ought to tell what each saw in our own little corner Shiloh is a work of imaginative fiction that relies on the evocative power of its medium readers seeking acomprehensive account of the battle will need to refer to other sources For those who remember Foote as the amiable, mellifluous southern storyteller and historian of Burns documentary, Shiloh confirms a literary prowess that was admired by peers such as Walker Percy and William Faulkner


  10. Tom Mathews Tom Mathews says:

    This was my second reading of one of the best historical novels ever written It gives readers a soldier s eye view of this incredibly fierce battle I highly recommend it.


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